Back to Normal Sooner with Oraverse

Oraverse

With today’s busy schedules, sometimes it’s difficult to make time for a dental appointment. The last thing you want is to have to spend several more hours after your appointment recovering from the numbing effects of the anesthetic.

Here at Designs for Dental Health, we believe that providing the best possible care also means minimizing your downtime! So, we use a “numbness reversal” product called OraVerse to get you back to your normal life, faster.

Resume Your Life In Half The Time

OraVerse brings patients who have received anesthesia back to normal sensation in half the time. Oraverse is a rather new product which we felt would offer a real benefit to some of our patients who really do not like that “numb” feeling or who need to be ready to get back to work fast. As always, feel free to let us know if you have any questions about this product.

Say Goodbye To Slurred Speech And Drooling!

After your appointment here, we know you may be headed back to work or school. We want to help get your sensations and speech back to normal as soon as possible.

In addition to helping you avoid embarrassment caused by slurred speech or drooling, OraVerse helps reduce the risk of injury caused by biting the inside of your cheek while you’re still numb.

Has Anything Funny Happened To YOU While Numb?

We feel like our relationship with you doesn’t end when you walk out our door.  Has anything funny happened to you when your mouth was numb? If so, share your story in our comments section below. We’d love to hear from you!

This article was originally featured on our secondary blog site.  You can find it by clicking on this link: http://designsfordentalhealthblog.com

The Best Way To Fill Your Tooth

Can You Just Fill It?

One question that dentists are asked all the time is: “Can you just fill it?” My goal with this particular article is to answer just that question.   And the answer is: That depends on several factors. First and foremost are the needs and desires of the particular patient.  Equally important is the condition of the tooth or teeth in question.

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First, let me begin by explaining that nearly all of today’s tooth restorations are made of ceramic. Ceramic encompasses the materials most commonly used to restore teeth today. This includes porcelain in various forms as well as composite, commonly known as “plastic” fillings.  In our practice, metal is rarely used except in specific cases where achieving a quality bond is impossible (deep under the gum) or the strength of metal is mandatory.  Ceramic materials offer a beautiful, lifelike appearance and can be bonded to tooth structure for strength and longevity.

The choice of whether to use a composite filling or some type of porcelain restoration is dependent upon the following five conditions:

1. The size of the cavity

Composite fillings makes sense when the cavity – whether caused by decay or fracture – is less than one third the width of the tooth and takes up less than 50% of the biting surface. Larger cavities with inadequate tooth to support a filling are best restored using porcelain.

2. A cracked tooth

If the tooth is cracked, a porcelain restoration is needed to protect the tooth from fracturing.  We commonly see cracked teeth when silver fillings, especially large ones, have been in place for many years.

3. Worn teeth

Teeth which are worn can be restored with either material depending upon the extent and location of wear.   Surfaces which receive heavy biting forces require the strength of porcelain to last a reasonable length of time.

4. Root canal

Teeth which have had root canal therapy generally require porcelain crowns to protect them from breakage, as these teeth are brittle and somewhat hollow as a result of the root canal.

5. Tooth Modifications

Sometimes teeth are restored to alter their shape and or appearance. Examples are gaps between teeth, poorly aligned teeth and teeth which are restored to improve the bite.  Larger modifications require the use of porcelain.

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Today’s porcelains are much different from those that were used only 10 to 15 years ago. Newer technology has produced ceramic materials with exceptional strength as well as a lifelike appearance.  In addition, these materials can be used to make crowns, commonly known as  “caps”, which cover the entire tooth.

fillThey can also be used as onlays or “partial caps” to preserve solid healthy tooth structure. These onlays are beautiful and long-lasting restorations which can be less costly than full crowns.

If you have any questions about which fillings are appropriate for you, please do not hesitate to call our office at 908.359.6655 or via our website at www.DesignsForDentalHealth.com

Cracked Tooth Syndrome – What You Need To Know

We have had several patients recently who have had problems related to cracked teeth. The symptoms of which these patients complain can be difficult for both the patient and the dentist.  Both can become frustrated because the underlying cause of symptoms is frequently difficult to pinpoint.  Often, patients will complain about pain which is caused by biting pressure and sometimes temperature.  It is frustrating for both parties because the described symptoms are often difficult to duplicate in the dental office.  It’s kind of like bringing your car to the dealer with a specific problem which suddenly vanishes as soon as you arrive at the dealership.

Cracked teeth generally occur for two reasons.  First, silver or amalgam fillings expand and contract as we consume hot and cold foods and beverages. The expansion and contraction of the filling is slightly greater than the tooth itself.  So, after years of such cycling in temperature-associated expansion and contraction, cracks frequently develop in the teeth.  Second, cracks may occur while chewing foods.  Commonly patients will describe a sharp pain in a tooth while they had been chewing, and the tooth will remain sensitive to biting pressure and/or temperature.

Cracked teeth are addressed in stages depending upon symptoms.  First, a bonded filling may be placed in an attempt to prevent the cracks from propagating further.  Depending on the depth and severity of the crack, an onlay or crown may be necessary to prevent the tooth from breaking.  An onlay covers any thin walls of the tooth which may be at risk for fracture and is considered a conservative, aesthetic and long-term restoration.  If the tooth has an extensive existing restoration or a more severe crack, then a crown which covers the entire tooth will be required to prevent the tooth from breaking.

In either case, the problem needs to be addressed as quickly as possible to prevent the crack from propagating further into the tooth leading to more severe dental problems.  For example, if the crack reaches the pulp of the tooth, then root canal therapy will be required as well.  The most severe complication would be the vertical tooth fracture which includes the root thereby making the tooth non-restorable.  In such cases removal of the tooth and replacement in some fashion will be required.

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The important points to remember are as follows:

1. Determine the exact source of discomfort first

2. Address the symptoms as quickly as possible

3. Begin with the most conservative treatment and progress as needed to eliminate all symptoms

Such teeth need to be followed on a regular basis to ensure that damage to the pulp has not occurred.  Appropriate x-rays at routine intervals will be helpful for this.  Keeping your dentist apprised of precise symptoms will also go a long way to help in diagnosis.

If you have any questions about cracked tooth syndrome please do not hesitate to contact our office by calling 908.359.6655 or on the web at www.DesignsForDentalHealth.com

New Root Canal System Offers Major Improvements

Several months ago we began using a new root canal technique and have found it to be vastly improved compared to the methods we were taught back in dental school some 30 years ago. If you have ever undergone a root canal, you will remember that we use little files that are twisted with our fingers. This technique, when followed to completion, was a very painstaking  as well as time-consuming one. Some years ago we began using a somewhat different technique which involved using a French-made piece of equipment to clean out the canals using an electric motor and rotary files. This technique was certainly a huge improvement over the finger file techniques we previously used. But, now, our newest system which was developed by Dentsply Corporation and called WaveOne™ offers even more advanced improvements.

The major improvement as far as patients will be concerned regarding this newest system is that cleaning the canals is completed in a fraction of the time that it used to take when we were filing with our fingers. In addition, the files used with this technique are meant to be used one time only. Each pre-sterilized file assures that there will be no contamination since each patient has her own single-use file.

In addition to these improvements in instrumentation, this technique offers an activator, which may more appropriately be called a vibrator, to agitate an antimicrobial or antibiotic solution within each prepared canal. This agitation thoroughly cleans the canal and any adjacent pores in the root where bacteria may hide, thus offering more complete debridement of each canal.

Finally, this system utilizes a filler which is warmed first to allow it to be more flowable. This flowability permits the filler material to better seal not only the canal itself but also any adjacent openings or tubules in the root.

We as dental practitioners have truly enjoyed using this vastly improved system, and patients have expressed their opinions of how simple and straightforward having a root canal felt to them. This was especially true of those patients who had previously undergone root canal therapy with older techniques and systems.

If you have any questions about root canal therapy or would like more information about the system that we use, feel free to contact us @ www.DesignsForDentalHealth.com or by calling our office @ 908.359.6655.